Vermeer: Master of Light (documentary)

Vermeer: Master of Light (Complete Documentary)

Vermeer: Master of Light is a visual pilgrimage in search of what makes a Vermeer a Vermeer. It is a journey of discovery, guiding the viewer through an examination of three of Johannes Vermeer’s paintings and exploring the “secrets” of his technique. Utilizing the potential of x-ray analysis and infrared reflectography as well as the power of computer technology, the program delves beneath the surface of the paintings to unveil fascinating insights into Vermeer’s work. This film celebrates one of the most extraordinary painters in the history of art. Narrated by Meryl Streep, with commentary by Arthur Wheelock, curator of northern baroque paintings, National Gallery of Art, and David Bull, conservator. This compilation video combines all 5 parts of the Vermeer: Master of Light video podcast series. –The National Gallery of Art

Jane Olivor’s rendition of Don McLean’s Vincent.

Lyrics:

Starry, starry night
Paint your palette blue and gray
Look out on a summer’s day
With eyes that know the darkness in my soul

Shadows on the hills
Sketch the trees and the daffodils
Catch the breeze and the winter chills
In colors on the snowy linen land

Now I understand
What you tried to say to me
How you suffered for your sanity
How you tried to set them free
They would not listen they did not know how
Perhaps they’ll listen now

For they could not love you
But still your love was true
And when no hope was left in sight
On that starry, starry night

You took your life as lovers often do
But I could have told you Vincent
This world was never meant for one
As beautiful as you

Starry, starry night
Portraits hung in empty halls
Frameless heads on nameless walls
With eyes that watch the world and can’t forget

Like the strangers that you’ve met
The ragged men in ragged clothes
The silver thorn, a bloody rose
Lie crushed and broken on the virgin snow

Now I think I know
What you tried to say to me
How you suffered for your sanity
How you tried to set them free
They would not listen, they’re not listening still
Perhaps they never will

Vincent (Starry Starry Night) by Don McLean

Starry starry night, paint your palette blue and grey
Look out on a summer’s day with eyes that know the darkness in my soul
Shadows on the hills, sketch the trees and the daffodils
Catch the breeze and the winter chills, in colors on the snowy linen land

Now I understand what you tried to say to me
How you suffered for you sanity
How you tried to set them free
They would not listen they did not know how, perhaps they’ll listen now

Starry starry night, flaming flowers that brightly blaze
Swirling clouds in violet haze reflect in Vincent’s eyes of china blue
Colors changing hue, morning fields of amber grain
Weathered faces lined in pain are soothed beneath the artist’s loving hand

Chorus:
For they could not love you, but still your love was true
And when no hope was left in sight, on that starry starry night
You took your life as lovers often do,
But I could have told you, Vincent,
This world was never meant for one as beautiful as you

Starry, starry night, portraits hung in empty halls
Frameless heads on nameless walls with eyes that watch the world and can’t forget.
Like the stranger that you’ve met, the ragged man in ragged clothes
The silver thorn of bloody rose, lie crushed and broken on the virgin snow

Now I think I know what you tried to say to me
How you suffered for you sanity How you tried to set them free
They would not listen they’re not listening still
Perhaps they never will.

                         

The more I thought about it, the more interesting and challenging the idea became. I put down the book and picked up my guitar, which was never far away, and started fiddling around, trying to get a handle on this idea, while the print of ‘Starry Night’ stared up at me. Looking at the picture, I realized that the essence of the artist’s life is his art. And so, I let the painting write the song for me. Everyone is familiar with that painting.” -Don McLean

(Source: Don McLean Online – http://www.don-mclean.com/?p=107)

Paris The Luminous Years: Toward the Making of the Modern 

              

                       Marc Chagall: Paris Through the Window, 1913 
            © 2010 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris
                       Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Paris the Luminous Years explores this unique moment in Paris from 1905 to 1930, decisive years for our contemporary culture, when an international group including Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Marc Chagall, Igor Stravinsky, Ernest Hemingway, Jean Cocteau, Gertrude Stein, Vaslav Nijinsky and Aaron Copland, among numerous others, revolutionized the direction of the modern arts.

*For more information, read review by Patricia Boccadoro from CultureKiosque

                                            ______________

A production of THIRTEEN for WNET.ORG, The Eloquent Image LLC, INA, and ARTE France in association with YLE Teema, Paris The Luminous Years is written, directed and produced by Perry Miller Adato. Margaret Smilow is executive producer; Junko Tsunashima and Kristin Lovejoy are producers; Kris Liem is editor.

Paris The Luminous Years: Towards The Making Of The Modern 

Paris The Luminous Years is the first television program to look at the city from a new and fresh perspective — the importance of a particular place in artistic creation. The film tells the story of Paris as magnet; the catalyst and the transforming force that attracted the finest talents of the era, molding the lives and work of two remarkable generations.

Through intriguing back stories of crucial relationships and of major turning points in the trajectory of the modern arts,Paris The Luminous Years reveals why breakthroughs like Picasso’s radical “Les Desmoiselles D’Avignon” that initiated Cubism and Stravinsky’s violent “The Rite of Spring” that pioneered modern music, could only happen in the international, fervent atmosphere of early twentieth century Paris.

   

A production of THIRTEEN for WNET.ORG, The Eloquent Image LLC, INA, and ARTE France in association with YLE Teema, Paris The Luminous Years is written, directed and produced by Perry Miller Adato. Margaret Smilow is executive producer; Junko Tsunashima and Kristin Lovejoy are producers; Kris Liem is editor.

In Conversation: El Anatsui with Susan Vogel (by BrooklynMuseum)

To celebrate his first solo exhibition in New York, El Anatsui discusses his rise to fame, his inspiration, and the process behind the large-scale installations on view in Gravity and Grace with Kevin Dumouchelle, Brooklyn Museum’s Associate Curator of the Arts of Africa and the Pacific Islands, and Susan Vogel, filmmaker and author of El Anatsui: Art and Life.

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui will feature over 30 installations in metal and wood that transform appropriated objects into site-specific sculptures.

The exhibition is organized by the Akron Art Museum and made possible by a major grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Generous support for this exhibition has been provided by Christie’s and The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica. The Brooklyn presentation is organized by Kevin Dumouchelle, Associate Curator of the Arts of Africa and the Pacific Islands, Brooklyn Museum.

Gravity and Grace: Monumental Works by El Anatsui – on view until August 4, 2013

El Anatsui, Earths Skin, 2007.

El Anatsui (Ghanaian, b. 1944, Earth’s Skin, 2007. Aluminum and copper wire, 177 x 394 in. (449.6 x 1000.8 cm). Courtesy of Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. Photo © 2013 Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times Company.

El Anatsui,Gli (Wall), 2010

El Anatsui (Ghanaian, b. 1944), Gli (Wall), 2010. Aluminum and copper wire, installation at the Brooklyn Museum, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Brooklyn Museum photograph.

El Anatsui,Gravity and Grace, 2010

El Anatsui (Ghanaian, b. 1944), Gravity and Grace, 2010. Aluminum and copper wire, 145 5/8 x 441 in. (369.9 x 1120.1 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Brooklyn Museum photograph.