Vogel 50×50: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection – Fifty Works for Fifty States

                            website:  http://vogel5050.org/

                 exhibitions:  http://vogel5050.org/#exhibitions

      participating institutions:  http://vogel5050.org/#institutions

                           Dorothy and Herbert Vogel at The Clocktower with a drawing by Philip Pearlstein behind them, 1975. Photograph by Nathaniel Tileston. © Nathaniel Tileston, 2008.

Civil servants by profession without independent financial means, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel acquired some 4,000 objects, primarily drawings, from the time of their marriage in 1962. Today these works constitute one of the most remarkable collections of contemporary art in America.

Frequently referred to as collectors of minimal and conceptual art, the Vogels always had a more expansive reach: art rooted in abstract expressionism (Michael Goldberg and Charles Clough), innovative post-minimalist approaches (Richard Francisco and Pat Steir), and diverse figurative directions (Will Barnet and Mark Kostabi). 

The Vogel 50×50 site brings together 2,500 contemporary artworks that were distributed throughout the nation as part of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States gift. Currently, 1,818 of 2,500 artworks have beenpublished on the site, and more are continuously added.

Read more….

(Click images to visit site):

                          

                          

                          

                                            ______________ 

*The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States is a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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Vogel 50×50: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection – Fifty Works for Fifty States

                            website:  http://vogel5050.org/

                 exhibitions:  http://vogel5050.org/#exhibitions

      participating institutions:  http://vogel5050.org/#institutions

                           Dorothy and Herbert Vogel at The Clocktower with a drawing by Philip Pearlstein behind them, 1975. Photograph by Nathaniel Tileston. © Nathaniel Tileston, 2008.

Civil servants by profession without independent financial means, Dorothy and Herbert Vogel acquired some 4,000 objects, primarily drawings, from the time of their marriage in 1962. Today these works constitute one of the most remarkable collections of contemporary art in America.

Frequently referred to as collectors of minimal and conceptual art, the Vogels always had a more expansive reach: art rooted in abstract expressionism (Michael Goldberg and Charles Clough), innovative post-minimalist approaches (Richard Francisco and Pat Steir), and diverse figurative directions (Will Barnet and Mark Kostabi). 

The Vogel 50×50 site brings together 2,500 contemporary artworks that were distributed throughout the nation as part of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States gift. Currently, 1,818 of 2,500 artworks have beenpublished on the site, and more are continuously added.

Read more….

(Click images to visit site):

                          

                          

                          

                                            ______________ 

*The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States is a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Art Tattler International

Art Tattler is “a journalistic-style reiterative web-based intervention of the organizational and curatorial aspects of exhibitions around the world.” It publishes a comprehensive directory of extended form exhibition listings, and also provides commentary in the form of solicited & unsolicited, signed criticism, reviews, opinions and essays.

  • Mike Miller, Publisher & Webmaster 
  • Hallie Smith, Editor 
  • Blair Schulman, Associate Editor

A few favorites from the archives:

Primitivists from Early 20th Century German, Expressionism Begins

(Bauernhöft in Marschlandschaft  (Farmouhouse in Marshland Landscape), ca. 1914. Watercolor. © Nolde, Stiftung Seebull, Photograph Sammlung Hermann Gerlinger).

German Expressionist Works on Paper, an Explosion of Modernism

(Procuress (Kupplerin), 1923. Lithograph, composition (irreg.): 19 1/16 x 14 1/2” (48.4 x 36.8 cm); sheet (irreg.): 23 5/8 x 18 5/16” (60 x 46.5 cm). Riva Castleman Endowment Fund)

A Posthumous Consideration of Cy Twombly at MOCA-LA

(Ferragasto III, Rom, 1961. Oil, wax crayon, lead pencil on canvas, 165 x 200.5 cm. Daros Collection. Schweiz, © Cy Twombly.)

Origins of Color Field Painting and American Post War Abstraction

(Morris Lewis, Floral V [detail], 1959-60. Denver, courtesy of the American Federation of the Arts]

Ernst Kirchner, die Brucke, the Berlin Street, WWI Existentialism

(Reclining Woman in White Chemise, ca. 1909. Oil on canvas, 95 x 121 cm. Stadel Museum, Frankfurt am Main.)

Art Tattler International

Currier Museum of Art | Browse Online Collection

http://www.currier.org/collections/browse-collections/

The Currier Museum of Art’s permanent collection contains about 13,000 American and European works of art, most of which can be viewed online along with interpretive text and zoomable images. 

The Currier Museum of Art is an internationally renowned art museum located in Manchester, New Hampshire. Its collection features European and American paintings, decorative arts, photographs and sculpture, including works by Picasso, Monet, O’Keeffe, Wyeth, and LeWitt…

Collections: 

Other Features:

The Whitney Museum of Art Collection – Works Online

website: http://whitney.org/Collection

The Whitney’s collection—comprising more than 19,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, films, videos, and new media by more than 2,900 artists—contains some of the most significant and exciting work created by artists in the United States during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

The Museum’s rich holdings of realist and modernist work, Precisionism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop art, and Minimalism are particular strengths of the collection. In addition, the Museum has collected work by individuals who have shaped recent artistic practice but defy easy categorization by movement or medium. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, the founder of the Museum, focused her collecting efforts on living artists, and this emphasis has been a guiding principle of the collection for the past eight decades. An appreciation of the areas of inquiry, working methods, and material exploration of today’s living artists guides our current acquisitions.

The Whitney Museum of Art Collection – Works Online

The Whitney Museum of Art Collection – Works Online

website: http://whitney.org/Collection

The Whitney’s collection—comprising more than 19,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, films, videos, and new media by more than 2,900 artists—contains some of the most significant and exciting work created by artists in the United States during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

The Museum’s rich holdings of realist and modernist work, Precisionism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop art, and Minimalism are particular strengths of the collection. In addition, the Museum has collected work by individuals who have shaped recent artistic practice but defy easy categorization by movement or medium. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, the founder of the Museum, focused her collecting efforts on living artists, and this emphasis has been a guiding principle of the collection for the past eight decades. An appreciation of the areas of inquiry, working methods, and material exploration of today’s living artists guides our current acquisitions.

The Whitney Museum of Art Collection – Works Online

Nancy Graves (American, 1940-1995)

Nancy Graves, Agualine, 1980, Oil on Canvas, Collection of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff, 2010.14.1 

       

Nancy Graves was an American sculptor, painter, and printmaker recognized for her ability to visually synthesize art and science.  She was the first woman to receive a solo retrospective at the Whitney Museum (Wikipedia: Nancy Graves). 

Graves’s personal aesthetic emerged in the later 1960s in the form of realistic life-size sculptures of camels. These works were rooted in her childhood memories of the animals preserved by taxidermists in the Natural History section of the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts and in the idioms of Abstract Expressionism taught at the Yale University School of Art where she was a student in the early 1960s. The interplay between the replication of nature and the formal values of abstract art was to inform her work throughout her life (Source:  Nancy Graves Foundation)

A recent acquisition of the National Gallery of Art, Agualine “builds on a lexicon of images that Graves developed through the 1970s but pushes those literal references to the very edge of abstraction…[and] with its gestural exuberance, loud color, and dispersed composition, can be seen as a contemporary successor to the National Gallery’s great painting by Wassily Kandinsky,Improvisation 31 (Sea Battle), 1913, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund” (National Gallery of Art). 

                               ____________________________

(Reference:  The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection: 1945 to 1995. Exh. cat. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1996: no. 29)