Jackson Pollock’s Mural

(Image: Jackson Pollock, Mural, 1943. Oil and casein on canvas, 242.9 x 603.9 cm. Gift of Peggy Guggenheim, 1959.6. University of Iowa Museum of Art. Reproduced with permission from The University of Iowa. On view at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice: Jackson Pollock’s Mural: Energy Made Visible (April 23 through November 16, 2015).

It’s “a stampede… [of] every animal in the American West, cows and horses and antelopes and buffaloes. Everything is charging across that goddamn surface.”
—Jackson Pollock

Exhibition Catalogue: Jackson Pollock’s Mural: Energy Made Visible by David Anfam (Thames & Hudson)

Insight into Jackson Pollock’s Mural from conservation scientists and curators at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI).


Sources & Further Reading:

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Artistic Inspiration: John Marin

Shall we consider the life of a great city as confined simply to the people and animals on its streets and in its buildings? Are the buildings themselves dead? … I see great forces at work: great movements; the large buildings and the small buildings; the warring of the great and the small; influences of one mass on another greater or smaller mass…. While these powers are at work pushing, pulling, sideways, downwards, upwards, I can hear the sound of their strife and there is great music being played. And so I try to express graphically what a great city is doing.” –Mari

Artistic Inspiration: John Marin

Adolph Gottlieb (American, 1903–1974), Masquerade, 1945

Adolph Gottlieb (American, 1903–1974), Masquerade, 1945. Oil and tempera on cnvas, 36 x 24 inches. The High Museum of Art Atlanta; Purchase with High Museum of Art Enhancement Fund and 20th Century Art Acquisition Fund; Accession no. 2000.201. © Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Masquerade is a classic example of Adolph Gottlieb’s pictographic style, imbued with a feeling of foreboding that is accentuated by its dark tonality. Mysterious faces emerge from the depth of the painting as if recalled from a dream. Ostensibly a display of tribal masks, Gottlieb reinforced this reading with earthy hues and textures. At the same time, the title he chose for the work directs attention to the use of masks throughout history and across cultures to act out ancient myths and rituals. The artist kept this painting with him throughout his life, and upon his death it became part of the foundation that bears his name, The Gottlieb Foundation, which awards grants to support the work of living artists.

Source: The High Museum of Art – Permenant Collection – Collection Highlights

Additional Resources:

Grace Hartigan, Lili Marlene, 2006. Oil on linen, 54 x 48 inches (137.2 x 121.9 cm). C. Grimaldis Gallery.

Hartigan is admired for having, as one critic noted, “resolved the problem that doomed many artists of the New York School: where to go from art in the 1950s.” Since she was able to reconcile abstraction with her usage of realism and iconography, she influenced many future artists, including Neo-Expressionists like David Salle and Julian Schnabel. She made the Maryland Institute College of Art a nationally prominent program and mentored hundreds of students during her tenure there. 

Source: ArtStory

          

           

                                  (courtesy: ArtStory)

Artistic Inspiration: Richard Pousette-Dart

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Richard Pousette-Dart, Desert, 1940. Oil on canvas, 43 x 72 inches. Museum of Modern Art, New York. © The Estate of Richard Pousette-Dart.

A fiercely independent artist throughout his career, Richard Pousette-Dart contributed meaningfully to key discourses that shaped the emergence of Abstract Expressionism. In 1948 he attended gatherings at the Subjects of the Artist school, an informal group organized by William Baziotes, David Hare, Robert Motherwell and Mark Rothko that would later became known as the Eighth Street Club. In 1950 he participated in a three-day conference at Studio 35, and a year later his painting was included in the landmark exhibition Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America at The Museum of Modern Art, which had acquired his Number 11: A Presence (1949). In 1951, Pousette-Dart gained additional renown by appearing in Nina Leen’s iconic photograph “The Irascibles” in Life Magazine featuring prominent painters who had formally protested contemporary art policies at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.</em

Courtesy The Estate of Richard Pousette-Dart

Source: https://informationaesthetic.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/artistic-inspiration-richard-pousette-dart/

Alice Baber (United States, 1928-1982), Journeying Blue, 1966. Oil on canvas, 39 1/4 x 39 1/4 in. (99.70 x 99.70 cm). Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), gift of Craig Hendrix (M.2009.74). © Estate of Alice Baber.

LACMA’s Curator Notes

A member of the American postwar abstract expressionist movement, Alice Baber achieved international recognition during the 1960s and 1970s. She is best identified with abstract staining, a technique most often identified with Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis, but also characteristic of Paul Jenkins, who Baber was briefly married to during the late 1960s.

She lived in France during part of the 1950s and 1960s and it was there that she painted Journeying Blue. Her work of this period shared with her husband’s an overall composition of colorful abstract forms noted for their glowing transparency. However, Baber worked with more controlled geometric shapes, usually ovoids, and applied the pigment by rubbing it into the canvas with her fingers rather than pouring the liquid in large gestural sweeps as did Jenkins. The energy of her paintings derived mainly from the congested yet orchestrated movement, often elliptical, of the shapes, which she referred to as “wind”; often the ovoids were directed towards a brilliant unstained white area near the center of the composition. Sometimes, as in Journeying Blue, her paintings tended toward the monochromatic.

Baber is not as well known as the other exponents of stain painting because she died at a relatively young age of fifty-four and devoted considerable time to teaching throughout the United States (including at the University of California campuses at Santa Barbara and Berkeley), organizing exhibitions of women artists, and writing about art. Her work is in collections in the United States and abroad, including the Museum of Modern Art and Metropolitan Museum.

Courtesy LACMA Collections

More Images

Alice Baber, Light and Shadow Crossing, 1977, Watercolor, Gift of The Estate of Alice Baber to Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C.

Alice Baber, Light and Shadow Crossing, 1977, Watercolor, Gift of The Estate of Alice Baber to Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C.

Alice Baber, Through Sleep to Orange, 1968, Oil on canvas, Gift of The Estate of Alice Baber to Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C.

Alice Baber, Through Sleep to Orange, 1968, Oil on canvas, Gift of The Estate of Alice Baber to Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C

Alice Baber, The Path of the Sun Leads to the Piper, n.d., Oil on canvas (can be displayed horizontally or vertically), Gift of The Estate of Alice Baber to Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C.

Alice Baber, The Path of the Sun Leads to the Piper, n.d., Oil on canvas (can be displayed horizontally or vertically), Gift of The Estate of Alice Baber to Art in Embassies, Washington, D.C.

Lee Krasner, Vernal Yellow (from Solstice Series), 1980. Oil, collage on canvas, 150 x 178. Ludwig Collection.

During the mid-fifties, Lee Krasner created a number of collaged paintings using drawings and paintings she had previously discarded. Twenty-five years later she used the same technique for a series that was exhibited in 1980 at the Pace Gallery in New York under the title “Solstice”. Vernal Yellow is from that series. For this work the artist integrated cut-out fragments of figurative charcoals from the 1930s, as well as non-representational lithographs into the canvas. A great tension can be felt between the lines and colours, between abstraction and figuration, as well as between surface and space. And throughout the whole one can feel the strongly pulsating rhythms of the artist’s spontaneous brushwork and of the elements she collaged in.

(Courtesy Museum Ludwig: From Abstract Expressionism to Colour Field Painting)