This may sound strange, but I wish to surround myself with contemporary works. It is a fact that new works are often inferior to good old works. However, if a work made today is honest, even though imperfect, it carries the sincerity and weakness of the maker which in return corresponds with the user. In this regard, both parties reach each other at a more intimate level.

~Shoji Hamada, 1892-1978


[1]. Shōji Hamada, Vase, ca. 1952. Stoneware, salt glaze with iron black painted decoration on white slip, 25 x 21 cm.

[2]. Shōji Hamada, Teabowl, 1944. Stoneware, ash glaze with inlaid and iron painted decoration, diam. 14.5 cm. Gift of Mr. Horio Mikio, The Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka.

[3]. Shōji Hamada, Bowl. Stoneware, white glaze with iron black poured decoration, diam. 50.6 cm. Gift of Mr. Horio Mikio, The Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka.

[4]. Shōji Hamada, Square Dish,
ca. 1970. Stoneware with trailed glaze decoration, 2 1/4” x 11” x 11” in. Gift of Glenn C. Nelson, Tweed Museum of Art, University of Minnesota Duluth.

[5]. Shōji Hamada, Square jar with octagonal opening. Stoneware with kaki glaze with akae (enamel) decoration, 9 in. (23 cm) in height.


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