Wassily Kandinsky, Studie zu Improvisation 3, 1909, Oil and gouache on cardboard in the artist’s painted frame

From Huffpost:

Titled “Studie zu Improvisation 3,” the 1909 painting is an early manifestation of the “Improvisations” series, in which the artist transformed the visual world into mesmerizing configurations of color and shape. Or, as Christies states in a press release, “they are among the first paintings in the history of art to mark the deliberate freeing of form and colour from their conventional pictorial duties towards the creation of non-material, non-objective and abstract art of the spirit.”

Link: “Wassily Kandinsky Auction: ‘Studie Zu Improvisation 3’ Expected To Sell For Up To $25 Million” – http://bit.ly/103dg87

ADDENDUM (20 June 2013)

Excerpt from Christie’s Auction House, Lot Notes -(http://bit.ly/16OJW6Q):

The transformation in Kandinsky’s own art during the years 1908-1910 was radical and unprecedented, and had come largely from within, stemming from the imperatives of his own “internal necessity.” There were no guideposts to mark the way as Kandinsky edged his way toward abstraction. In 1909 he could sense where his destination might lay, but it was not until two years later, when the text of On the Spiritual in Art was given its final revisions and first published in December 1911 (dated January 1912 on the title page), that he could look back on his recent work and assess the means that had taken him this far.

The transformation in Kandinsky’s own art during the years 1908-1910 was radical and unprecedented, and had come largely from within, stemming from the imperatives of his own “internal necessity.” There were no guideposts to mark the way as Kandinsky edged his way toward abstraction. In 1909 he could sense where his destination might lay, but it was not until two years later, when the text of On the Spiritual in Art was given its final revisions and first published in December 1911 (dated January 1912 on the title page), that he could look back on his recent work and assess the means that had taken him this far.

“Today I can see many things more freely, with a broader horizon,” he wrote in the foreword to the second edition, published in April 1912 (ibid., p. 125). He divided his paintings during this period into three categories:

“1. The direct impression of ‘external nature,’ expressed in linear-painterly form. I call these pictures ‘Impressions.’

“2. Chiefly unconscious, for the most part suddenly arising expressions of events of an inner character, hence impressions of ‘internal nature.’ I call this type ‘Improvisations.’

“3. The expressions of feelings that have been forming within me in a similar way (but over a very long period of time), which, after the first preliminary sketches, I have slowly and almost pedantically examined and worked out. This kind of picture I call a ‘Composition’” (in “Concerning the Spiritual in Art,” ibid., p. 218)Today I can see many things more freely, with a broader horizon,” he wrote in the foreword to the second edition, published in April 1912 (ibid., p. 125).

He divided his paintings during this period into three categories:

“1. The direct impression of ‘external nature,’ expressed in linear-painterly form. I call these pictures ‘Impressions.’

“2. Chiefly unconscious, for the most part suddenly arising expressions of events of an inner character, hence impressions of ‘internal nature.’ I call this type ‘Improvisations.’

“3. The expressions of feelings that have been forming within me in a similar way (but over a very long period of time), which, after the first preliminary sketches, I have slowly and almost pedantically examined and worked out. This kind of picture I call a ‘Composition’” (in “Concerning the Spiritual in Art,” ibid., p. 218)

Advertisements